7 Valentine’s Day Money Saving Tips

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The Generation Money Guarantee

Generation Money logo

At Generation Money our purpose is to help you make better financial decisions. All of our articles are independently written and/or edited by finance professionals and adhere to strict editorial guidelines. This post may contain links which, if clicked, could result in a payment to the site. These links never impact our editorial policy and all rankings and product recommendations remain unbiased. For more details, read how this site is financed.

Is there anything more romantic than cancelling Valentine’s Day plans and contributing to your ISAs instead?

Not if you ask us. But, if you do want to celebrate with your loved one on a budget we’ve put together 7 ways to save money this Valentine’s Day. 

Cook instead of eating out

Instead of spending money eating out, a great – and romantic – alternative is to stay in and cook instead.

If you know that you’re the better chef in the relationship then you could suggest cooking a romantic meal for the both of you at home. Alternatively, suggest that you both cook together and make it into a fun activity for the both of you.

Set meals and special offers

If you do want to eat out for Valentine’s Day, look out for set meals and special offers at restaurants. You should also search for offers on organised activities and treatments, such as spa days, too as they often have deals around Valentine’s Day.

Set meals and offers can save money versus ordering a la carte and adds a bit of a Valentine’s theme to dinner. Remember to book in advance and quote any offers or menus that you intend to use – some restaurants only honour them if mentioned at the time of booking.

Get outdoors

This is a potentially risky one for the middle of February so it’s a good idea to check the weather in advance. 

If the weather looks promising then a picnic (with plenty of blankets) could be a great idea. For the more adventurous, you can plan a romantic bike ride in the countryside, or a walking tour of the nearest cute village.

Choose a fun (and free) activity

This can be indoors or outdoors, but if you have a hobby you both enjoy then plan a day of it together. 

For gamers this could be starting a new game together. Or perhaps there’s a new series on Netflix you’ve been meaning to start, so Valentine’s Day is the perfect time to set aside time to binge watch it together.

If it’s a case of ‘opposites attract’ and you have no hobbies in common, maybe it’s time to find a new, fun and free one that you can both get into.

Get creative with homemade gifts

Remember the mixtape Chandler gave to Monica in Friends? Well, it doesn’t have to turn out quite the same way as when Monica realises it was originally recorded by Chandler’s ex…

The 2024 equivalent is to make a thoughtful Spotify playlist, but there are also decently priced ‘DIY’ kits for all sorts of gift ideas. These include candle-making kits, bake-at-home kits and paint boxes for the artist in you.

You can even make it into a fun activity to do together on Valentine’s Day.

Agree a spending limit

So you’ve ignored our above suggestions and want to go ahead with buying gifts or spending money on a meal out anyway. If so, then talk to your partner in advance and agree on a spending limit. 

Money can be a touchy subject for many, so preface the conversation. For example, if you’ve been on a January health kick or started off the New Year on a budget then use this as a starting point. From there you can lead into how agreeing a budget for Valentine’s Day ties in with both of you keeping up with your goals.

The important thing is to communicate openly. Plus, you can avoid the awkward situation where one of you spends a lot more than the other. 

Or, skip it altogether

The least romantic suggestion on this list, but who wants to celebrate a consumerist, materialist, capitalist-driven day of the year anyway? At least that’s the excuse you can give to your partner when you suggest skipping it…

Not celebrating Valentine’s Day at all will save you the most money out of the suggestions on this list. But it might not get you in your partner’s good books when you suggest it, so perhaps you should consider one of the money saving options above instead. 

Final Thoughts

Although your wallet might thank us for suggesting that you ignore Valentine’s Day altogether, your partner may not. 

If you follow some of the tips above you’ll be able to have a romantic day with your partner without breaking the bank.

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